Is it safe to take Para at 18 weeks of pregnancy?

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Hi doctor, can i ask you for my first time having pregnant and now i have geted sick or 4 days. I really worry about taking drugs treatment.So,can i take para ? and is it safe taking para during my 18 weeks pregnancy ?

If you’re pregnant and feel you need to take painkillers, paracetamol is usually safe to take. However, before taking any medicine when you’re pregnant, you should get advice from your doctor. But if the fever gets really high or lasts a long time, it’s best to call your doctor. When flu season is coming, keep in mind that all pregnant women are advised to get a flu shot, which can help prevent flu-related fevers.

When you catch cold, the following measures may help to make you feel more comfortable:
Increase your fluid intake to eight of liquids per day. Juices or fruits also provide extra fluids, as well as nutritional intake at a time when your appetite may be decreased.

If you do not feel like eating, try to maintain your nutritional intake with small meals instead of three regular meals.
Increase your rest periods.

If you are taking medication for a disease you need to discuss this with your doctor, as some medications may affect your baby. For instance, Pregnancy category X (see the table below) contains medicines that you have to stop during your pregnancy.

FDA Pharmaceutical Pregnancy Categories

Pregnancy Category: A

Definition: In human studies, pregnant women used the medicine and their babies did not have any problems related to using the medicine. In human studies, pregnant women used the medicine and their babies did not have any problems related to using the medicine.

Examples of drugs:

  • Folic acid
  • Levothyroximone medicine (thyroid hormone)

Pregnancy Category: B

Definition: In humans, there are no good studies. But in animal studies, pregnant animals received the medicine, and the babies did not show any problems related to the medicine.
Or
In animal studies, pregnant animals received the medicine, and some babies had problems. But in human studies, pregnant women used the medicine and their babies did not have any problems related to using the medicine.

Examples of drugs:

  • Some antibiotics like Amoxicillin.
  • Zofran (Ondansetron) for nausea
  • Glucophage (Metformin) for diabetes
  • Some Insulins used to treat diabetes such as regular and NPH insulin

Pregnancy Category: C

Definition: In humans, there are no good studies. In animals, pregnant animals treated with the medicine had some babies with problems. However, sometimes the medicine may still help the human mothers and babies more than it might harm.
Or
No animal studies have been done, and there are no good studies in pregnant women.

Examples of drugs:

  • Diflucan (Fluconazole) for yeast infections
  • Ventolin (Albuterol) for asthma
  • Zoloft (Sertraline) and Prozac
  • (Fluoxetine) for depression

Pregnancy Category: D

Definition: Studies in humans and other reports show that when pregnant women use the medicine, some babies are born with problems related to the medicine. However, in some serious situations, the medicine may still help the mother and the baby more than it might harm.

Examples of drugs:

  • Paxil (Paroxetine) for depression
  • Lithium for bipolar disorder
  • Dilantin (Phenytoin) for epileptic seizures
  • Some cancer chemotherapy

Pregnancy Category: X

Definition: Studies or reports in humans or animals show that mothers using the medicine during pregnancy may have babies with problems related to the medicine. There are no situations where the medicine can help the mother or baby enough to make the risk of problems worth it. These medicines should never be used by pregnant women.

Examples of drugs:

  • Accutane (Isotretinoin) for cystic acne
  • Thalomid (Thalidomide) for a type of skin disease

Ref: http://www.womenshealth.gov

Thank you very much,

Boonsaeng Wutthiphan ,M.D.
OB/GYN and Infertility Specialist
Samitivej Hospital

ExpectingExpats.com

Expecting Expats is the online resource for parents in and around Thailand.

We provide lifestyle and medical content to our visitors, with new content posted daily. Our lifestyle contributors are themselves expat moms who share their experiences and lessons learned through blog articles. We also provide medical content from our partner doctors at Samitivej Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Articles of interest span from before pregnancy through the toddler years and cover medical, behavioral and cognitive issues.

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